By Mike Pallin, President of The Floyd Wickman Team "Holidays are joyful, and there's always something new." -Richard Carpenter, Merry Christmas Darling

"But I'll have a blue, blue, blue, blue Christmas."  -Elvis, Blue Christmas

Well, Holidays are supposed to be joyful, but for many people the Holidays magnify what's missing in their lives. It seems all feelings, good and bad, are amplified this time of year.

Christmas blues are one thing, but much more common and problematic are the "blahs," not as deep and troubling as the blues, but more like some constant vague discomfort. We can feel out of synch, a little bit irritable and scratchy, forced into idleness, just not with it.

We had some great brainstorming sessions this week with Floyd Wickman Program graduates on how to avoid and counteract those 'blahs," and I wanted to offer a best-of-compilation of advice from some of the best trained master salespeople in North America.

Everyone agreed that the blues and the blahs can be serious, and better dealt with than ignored. Don’t hope they will go away on their own; or try to wait them out until Super Bowl Sunday when we can all go back to work.

Everyone agreed that all the new and weird transaction dramas add to the problem.

We were reminded of the formula for happiness that we heard from Floyd: Have something to do, something to look forward to, and someone to love.

Over and over we were reminded to exercise. When the weather changes, we have a tendency to stay indoors more and get less fresh air and exercise.

Pay attention to the way our diet changes this time of year. Holidays become an excuse to overdo sugars and carbs. When was the last time you saw a Holiday Veggie tray?

Pay attention to things like Seasonal Affective Disorder. It's stays darker longer this time of year. Some people respond well to melatonin boosts and SAD corrective sun lamps.

This is the best time of year to reconnect with the positive end result of our work - go visit those people you have helped into a new home; people you have helped to avoid foreclosure and permanent credit damage; people who are grateful and appreciative.

Don't expect gratitude and appreciation, as if gratitude and appreciation are something we are entitled to - but rather, go out and express your gratitude and appreciation, and you will always be pleased with the response.

During the busy times, when we are racing from deal to deal, madly dashing from the closing table to the next appointment, we often miss the time to reflect and let the good that we do for our clients sink in and take root.

And while you are visiting happy people, attend more parties, network, and give out your cards with a positive response whenever asked, "How's business?"

The blahs are a form of self-indulgence, and volunteering to help others less fortunate is a sure way to get your attention off yourself and gain some perspective that can chase those blahs away.

Remember that most people are productive when they feel good, and produce when they feel like it. If the blahs have you stopped, remind yourself with affirmations, "I am better than this mood. I am stronger than this mood. I am smarter than this mood."

Finally, let me repeat Floyd's advice and get yourself booked for the first couple weeks of January - call all those people who have put you off until "after the first of the year" and get an appointment date. Nothing like a full calendar at the start of next year to make for a rejuvenating guilt-free break at the end of this year.

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